Millennial Outreach #12


Understanding the Constitution (part 1)
Part of this understanding must be understood from the stand point of those who made this document. What caused them to make it and thus leave, rebel, against the country they were originally a part, the British Empire.
The British considered those that lived within their colonies to be second class citizens. They looked down upon those that they saw as ignorant and backward. Even though they had come from the island of Great Britain, and had the same or greater education and intelligence they were seen as unequal. It is this mentality that caused the American Revolution.
Those that formed the government of the newly formed Untied States did not wish this mentality to continue. Even though many within this new nation were still seen as less than human, that being those that were black and white that were called slaves. Many within the government did not wish for this to continue thus forming this document that is called the “Constitution” to be as it is. Opening the door to some changes that those that made this document knew would take time. This is seen in the letter by George Washington use to present this document for approval by the very first congress of this nation.
“It is obviously impracticable in the Federal Government of these States to secure all rights of independent sovereignty to each, and yet provide for the interest and safety of all. Individuals entering into society must give up a share of liberty to preserve the rest. The magnitude of the sacrifice must depend as well on situation and circumstance, as on the object to be obtained. It is at all times difficult to draw with precision the line between those rights which must be surrendered, and those which may be preserved; and, on the present occasion, this difficulty was increased by a difference among the several States as to their situation, extent, habits, and particular interests.
“In all our deliberations on this subject, we kept steadily in our view that which appears to us the greatest interest of every true American, the consolidation of our Union, in which is involved our prosperity, felicity, safety—perhaps our national existence. This important consideration, seriously and deeply impressed on our minds, led each State in the Convention to be less rigid on points of inferior magnitude than might have been otherwise expected; and thus, the Constitution which we now present is the result of a spirit of amity, and of that mutual deference and concession, which the peculiarity of our political situation rendered indispensable.
“That it will meet the full and entire approbation of every State is not, perhaps, to be expected; but each will, doubtless, consider, that had her interest alone been consulted, the consequences might have been particularly disagreeable or injurious to others; that it is liable to as few exceptions as could reasonably have been expected, we hope and believe; that it may promote the lasting welfare of that Country so dear to us all, and secure her freedom and happiness, is our most ardent wish.”
Many states did not wish for slavery to continue while others did. But they understood at the time of the writing of this document that to keep this newly formed Untied States that there must be a compromise that would have to be addressed at a later date.
However, there were other things that were non-negotiable. This things formed the first ten amendments of the Constitution. There are now twenty-seven of these amendments.
The first ten though are the ones we will address at this time, because they dealt with the issues that were caused by the British and thus caused the revolution.
1) The freedom of expression and religion
2) Bearing arms
3) Quartering soldiers
4) Search and seizure
5) Rights of the individual
6) Rights of the accused in criminal prosecution
7) Civil trials
8) Furthers guarantees in criminal cases
9) The unenumerated rights
10) Reserved powers
Each of these were crimes committed by the British Empire upon those that lived within the American colonies.
The British would not allow people to openly say what they wished to, and so many were killed, imprisoned and tortured as a result. Also many had come to America to freely worship God as they saw fit, and not under the dictates of the control of the government, which is still for the most part the practice even to this day within Great Britain. Since the king was the head of the British church. Unfortunately, this amendment is being violated within the United Sates at this time. It is also the desire of those within universities to further infringe upon this right today.
As for bearing arms we must look at the wording of the amendment directly to fully understand its intent:
“A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.”
The “militia” is a military force that is raised from the civil population to supplement a regular army in an emergency and consists of all able-bodied civilians eligible by law for military service. However to be able to form this “militia” the citizen will not have this right acted upon so as to limit or undermine or encroach upon it. That means to be able to be called upon the purchase of Assault type weapons so as to be able to defend this nation in time of an emergency cannot be regulated. For no one can know when an emergency may arise. The average citizen must provide their own weapons, not be issued a weapon by the government, since in an emergency there may be no way to issues said weapons.
Why is this necessary? “to the security of a free State.”
So those that wish to regulate guns wishes not to have a free state, but wish to be like the British Empire in the 1700s. Looking down upon all others, because they see themselves as the special the chosen the righteous, when they in reality are not.
End part 1

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